Have Insiders Been Buying oOh!media Limited (ASX:OML) Shares This Year?

Have Insiders Been Buying oOh!media Limited (ASX:OML) Shares This Year?It is not uncommon to see companies perform well in the years after insiders buy shares. On the other hand, we'd be...


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Have Insiders Been Selling Chinese Strategic Holdings Limited (HKG:8089) Shares This Year?

Have Insiders Been Selling Chinese Strategic Holdings Limited (HKG:8089) Shares This Year?We've lost count of how many times insiders have accumulated shares in a company that goes on to improve markedly...


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Is Dyna-Mac Holdings (SGX:NO4) Using Debt Sensibly?

Is Dyna-Mac Holdings (SGX:NO4) Using Debt Sensibly?Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously...


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Those Who Purchased Media Asia Group Holdings (HKG:8075) Shares Five Years Ago Have A 87% Loss To Show For It

Those Who Purchased Media Asia Group Holdings (HKG:8075) Shares Five Years Ago Have A 87% Loss To Show For ItSome stocks are best avoided. We really hate to see fellow investors lose their hard-earned money. Anyone who held...


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Those Who Purchased Media Asia Group Holdings (HKG:8075) Shares Five Years Ago Have A 87% Loss To Show For It

Those Who Purchased Media Asia Group Holdings (HKG:8075) Shares Five Years Ago Have A 87% Loss To Show For ItSome stocks are best avoided. We really hate to see fellow investors lose their hard-earned money. Anyone who held...


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Gay rights across the globe

Gay rights across the globeThirty years after the first-ever gay civil unions in Denmark, same-sex marriages are today allowed in 28 countries, but homosexuality remains illegal in some parts of the world. After the liberalisation of same sex marriage came into force in Northern Ireland on Monday, here is an overview of the global situation. On October 1, 1989, for the first time in the world, several gay couples in Denmark tied the knot in legal civil unions.


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Gay rights across the globe

Gay rights across the globeThirty years after the first-ever gay civil unions in Denmark, same-sex marriages are today allowed in 28 countries, but homosexuality remains illegal in some parts of the world. After the liberalisation of same sex marriage came into force in Northern Ireland on Monday, here is an overview of the global situation. On October 1, 1989, for the first time in the world, several gay couples in Denmark tied the knot in legal civil unions.


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Avoid Buying Palm From Malaysia, Indian Group Tells Members

Avoid Buying Palm From Malaysia, Indian Group Tells Members(Bloomberg) -- The trade spat between India, the world’s biggest palm buyer, and Malaysia seems to be escalating, with an influential processors’ group in Mumbai asking its members to refrain from buying the tropical oil from the second-largest producer. Futures in Kuala Lumpur fell on Tuesday.Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad last month told the United Nations that India “invaded and occupied” Kashmir. Since then, Indian buyers of palm oil have been turning to Indonesia for supplies because of concerns that Prime Minister Narendra Modi will curb purchases of the vegetable oil from Malaysia.“The recent developments pertaining to strained relations between our nation and Malaysia have put a lot of responsibility on our industry in view of huge imports of palm oil” from the Southeast Asian country, the Solvent Extractors’ Association of India said in a statement on Monday. “In your own interest as well as a mark of solidarity with our nation, we should avoid purchases from Malaysia for the time being.”Any action by India to stop palm oil purchases will hit at the heart of Malaysia’s industry. Palm oil is the country’s biggest agricultural export, with India purchasing about 3.9 million tons between January and September, worth about $2 billion. That’s more than double last year’s shipments after New Delhi cut import duties on the commodity in January 2019.Malaysia will seek a diplomatic solution if India restricts imports of some products, Mahathir has said. Palm oil in Kuala Lumpur fell 0.7% to 2,268 ringgit a ton, retreating again after closing at the highest in eight months Friday. ‘Huge Step’“It’s huge step and will have a negative impact on Malaysian palm producers,” said Gnanasekar Thiagarajan, head of trading and hedging strategies at Kaleesuwari Intercontinental. “Though there is enough oil in the pipeline, some tightness in the palm oil market is expected due to the developments, which could benefit other vegetable oils.”The spat is the latest regional diplomatic dispute to impact trade flows. South Korea and Japan’s disagreement earlier this year over the latter’s colonization of the Korean Peninsula has resulted in stricter export checks and hits to tourism, while the China-U.S. conflict over issues including intellectual property has roiled global trade flows and financial markets.Indian processors should boost purchases of vegetable oils from other countries such as Indonesia, Ukraine and Argentina to make up for the shortfall in purchases from Malaysia, said B.V. Mehta, executive director of the processors’ group.(Updates to add futures in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Pratik Parija in New Delhi at pparija@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: James Poole at jpoole4@bloomberg.net, Atul Prakash, Abhay SinghFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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Should You Like Tingyi (Cayman Islands) Holding Corp.’s (HKG:322) High Return On Capital Employed?

Should You Like Tingyi (Cayman Islands) Holding Corp.’s (HKG:322) High Return On Capital Employed?Today we are going to look at Tingyi (Cayman Islands) Holding Corp. (HKG:322) to see whether it might be an attractive...


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Infosys Dives Most in Six Years After Whistle-Blowers Target CEO

Infosys Dives Most in Six Years After Whistle-Blowers Target CEO(Bloomberg) -- Infosys Ltd.’s shares plunged to a 10-month low in New York after whistle-blowers accused Chief Executive Officer Salil Parekh of leading an effort to shore up profits through irregular accounting, turning up the heat on an IT services giant that endured internal turmoil just two years ago.The letter, addressed to the board and published by the Deccan Herald, charged Parekh with “unethical practices” to boost revenues and profit in recent quarters, anonymous whistle-blowers wrote in a memo titled “Disturbing unethical practices.” They asked the board to investigate and take immediate action, offering to provide emails and voice recordings to support their allegations. Infosys said in a statement its Audit Committee will look into the accusations and handle the matter in accordance with policy. Its American Depositary Receipts slid more than 12%, their biggest single-day fall since 2013.The complaint dated Sept. 20 is the latest in a series of whistle-blower complaints that wrought havoc at Asia’s second-most valuable IT services firm, triggering the exit of previous CEO Vishal Sikka after a confrontation with co-founder Narayana Murthy. The company, a symbol of India’s early technological boom, had gained more than 15% of market value this year as it stabilized the business with a transition toward automation. Chairman and co-founder Nandan Nilekani had only just proclaimed last year that Infosys had become “boring again.”The allegations “could severely damage the company’s pristine brand if true, especially in the IT services industry,” Bloomberg Intelligence analyst Anurag Rana wrote. “It could also hurt short-term sales, as clients may look for other providers for newer projects.”Read more: Infosys Profit Slides After Companies Skimped on SpendingThe allegations come as Infosys and larger rival Tata Consultancy Services Ltd., which build software and provide services to some of the world’s largest banks and retailers, navigate an increasingly difficult business environment. The industry is grappling with a trend toward automation and rapid technology changes.This month, Infosys posted a 2% fall in quarterly profit after nervous clients held off on spending and growth in traditional service contracts stalled. That underscored the challenge for Parekh, who has pledged to drive growth in digital services, re-energize core offerings, re-skill employees and hire locally in a key U.S. market where a tightening H-1B visa regime is making it more difficult to import labor. Tata Consultancy also posted earnings that lagged projections.“The whistle-blower complaint has been placed before the Audit Committee as per the company’s practice and will be dealt with in accordance with the company’s whistle-blowers policy,” Infosys said in an emailed statement.\--With assistance from Debjit Chakraborty, Abhay Singh and Devidutta Tripathy.To contact the reporter on this story: Saritha Rai in Bangalore at srai33@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, ;Arijit Ghosh at aghosh@bloomberg.net, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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i.century Holding (HKG:8507) Has Debt But No Earnings; Should You Worry?

i.century Holding (HKG:8507) Has Debt But No Earnings; Should You Worry?The external fund manager backed by Berkshire Hathaway's Charlie Munger, Li Lu, makes no bones about it when he says...


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An African American security guard fired after he asked a student to not call him the n-word is ‘back’ – CNN

  1. An African American security guard fired after he asked a student to not call him the n-word is 'back'  CNN
  2. Union Official: Fired Wisconsin School Guard Gets Job Back  Snopes.com
  3. Wisconsin school district draws criticism for firing black security guard who used N-word while telling studen  New York Daily News
  4. Fired Wisconsin school security guard Marlon Anderson gets job back  Chicago Tribune
  5. Cher offers to pay legal fees for security guard fired for repeating racial slur | TheHill  The Hill
  6. View full coverage on Google News

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Fears Are Growing Among Mainland Chinese Living in Hong Kong

Fears Are Growing Among Mainland Chinese Living in Hong Kong(Bloomberg) -- As Hong Kong’s historic protests become increasingly violent, mainland Chinese living in the city are becoming increasingly fearful.Min, who moved to Hong Kong from the mainland in 1995 and now runs his own hedge fund, said the startling escalation in mayhem prompted him to tell his children not to speak Mandarin in public for fear they’ll get beaten up in the Cantonese-speaking city.Before going out for dinner, Min checks his phone for news on which city streets are blocked due to mass marches or violent clashes. He stopped flying on the city’s flagship carrier, Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd., where some staff took part in protests and others were fired after investigations into depleted oxygen tanks. With battles between police and black-clad mobs becoming pervasive, Min said he’s considered moving his business to Shanghai and his family to Canada.“They have no moral bottom line as to what they’ll do to achieve their goals,” Min, who asked that his full name not be used for fear of retribution, said of the protesters. “Fingers crossed, I believe the police can crush this.”The strife ripping through Hong Kong -- with police officers and protesters in hand-to-hand combat, subway stations set ablaze and an improvised explosive device detonated near a police car -- looks very different to the city’s mainland-born residents. Since Hong Kong’s handover from the U.K. to China in 1997, professionals from the mainland flocked to the city, and they now make up more than 1 million among the population of about 7.5 million.The protests began in opposition to a since-scrapped government bill allowing extraditions to mainland China and have expanded to include calls for greater democracy and an independent inquiry into police tactics. While the majority of protesters are peaceful, the demonstrations often feature a darker, anti-China tone. Some demonstrators have burned Chinese flags and spray-painted the phrases “Chinazi” and “Hong Kong is not China!” across the city.The rhetoric is spilling over into violence on both sides. A 22-year-old mainland visitor accused of slashing a teenage Hong Kong protester in the abdomen surrendered to police this week.Over the weekend, gangs ransacked or destroyed Chinese bank branches and retail businesses, including an outlet for smartphone maker Xiaomi Corp. based in Beijing.The tensions between mainlanders and locals also surface in daily office interactions.“Employees are generally encouraged to not discuss this topic at work and to leave political opinions at home,” said Benjamin Quinlan, chief executive officer of financial-services consultancy Quinlan & Associates. Still, “you can’t segregate a private and corporate life so cleanly, and there will inevitably be opinions on politics that don’t gel among colleagues.”When crowds surged into the streets recently, Yang, a 34-year-old finance professional from China, watched from above in one of the city’s gleaming skyscrapers.TVs in the office -- and desktop live-streams -- were all tuned to the protests against Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam’s impending use of a colonial-era emergency powers law to ban face masks on demonstrators. Mobile phones buzzed with messages flowing across WeChat groups about looming protests and violence outside, including one alarming video of a Chinese banker from JPMorgan Chase & Co. getting punched in the head by a protester, and someone yelling: “Go back to the mainland!”On Tuesday morning, lawmakers debated the ban on face coverings at the city’s Legislative Council.Yang, who asked to be identified only by one name, also is scared to speak Mandarin and has been regularly fleeing across the border to nearby Shenzhen to escape the violence. That Friday afternoon, she left early and dashed to meet her husband and daughter at the bus station, right before the city descended into its worst violence on the weekend of Oct. 5.“As I rushed to the bus station to regroup with my family, I was so stressed -- hearing my heart beating quickly and strongly,” she said, adding she bought the last three tickets for a bus that whisked them all to Shenzhen, which was celebrating 70 years of Communist rule with buildings and billboards decked out in red lights.“When the bus crossed the bridge and was about to enter Shenzhen, we all saw the red neon at the other side of the river,” she said. “I felt suddenly relaxed.”At the same time, several mainlanders interviewed said they were reluctant to uproot the lives they built in Hong Kong over many years: landing coveted jobs at international companies, getting their children into international schools and buying homes. And plenty of Mandarin conversations can be heard while walking through the financial district.Yet while many mainlanders say they feel shunned by some Hong Kongers, many locals worry that showing support for the protests will hurt their careers. Some Hong Kong employees working at Chinese firms said they were told to attend pro-Beijing demonstrations, and feared losing their jobs if they refused.Pro-Beijing RalliesOne Hong Konger with the surname Ho, who took a job at a U.S.-based bank over the summer after working at a Chinese bank in the city for three years, said mainland colleagues at her former employer would try to find out her stance on the conflict -- and criticize anyone they thought supported the protesters.“I was asked to attend the rallies that support the Hong Kong police,” said the employee, who asked not to be identified by her full name to avoid hurting her career. “Of course, I didn’t go. Then some of my former colleagues linked my resignation to my political views. They thought I was fired because I’m pro-independence, which wasn’t true.”In the financial sector, the conflicts between those sympathetic to protesters and those aligned with Beijing can be seen in instances both subtle and dramatic.Hao Hong, chief strategist at Bocom International Holdings Co. in Hong Kong, recently visited another company to meet with workers from mainland China, stepping into an office and speaking to them in Mandarin. Their local colleague quickly raised the volume on a nearby TV, overpowering the conversation with the sound of a show -- in Cantonese.Moving Back“Sometimes people refuse to talk to you if you speak to them in Mandarin,” said Hong, who’s lived in the former British colony for eight years. “Everyone is touchy.”In addition to not speaking Mandarin in public, other mainlanders said they have stopped using WeChat -- the Tencent Holdings Ltd.-owned Chinese messaging service -- in the open.Some have started considering relocating back to the mainland, despite spending decades in the city, said one woman who works at a Chinese hedge fund and asked that she only be identified as Levy. Mainlanders with children in local schools are concerned they will be exposed to anti-government sentiment, she said.“We are all in the financial industry,” Levy said. “If they can find good offers in Shanghai or Beijing, there is now a stronger incentive to move back.”(Updates starting in paragraph 13 with lawmakers debating mask ban, some mainlanders saying they will stay in Hong Kong.)\--With assistance from Manuel Baigorri, Moxy Ying, Lulu Yilun Chen and Iain Marlow.To contact the reporters on this story: Bei Hu in Hong Kong at bhu5@bloomberg.net;Alfred Cang in Singapore at acang@bloomberg.net;Alfred Liu in Hong Kong at aliu226@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Candice Zachariahs at czachariahs2@bloomberg.net, ;Daniel Ten Kate at dtenkate@bloomberg.net, Daniel Taub, Michael TigheFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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China’s Central Bank Boosts Liquidity Ahead of Tax Payment Surge

China’s Central Bank Boosts Liquidity Ahead of Tax Payment Surge(Bloomberg) -- China’s central bank used open-market operations to inject the largest amount of cash into the banking system since May, as upcoming corporate tax payments tighten liquidity conditions.The People’s Bank of China on Tuesday net injected 250 billion yuan ($35 billion) via seven-day reverse repurchase agreements, according to a statement. There were no facilities coming due Tuesday, and the central bank kept the rate steady at 2.55%. China’s 10-year bond yield was little changed at 3.22%.The central bank is acting to fine-tune interbank liquidity conditions while it keeps broader monetary-policy settings stable, seeking to keep credit growth appropriate while avoiding rapid debt build-up as the economy slows. The move comes before an Oct. 24 deadline for companies to pay tax, which typically increases the demand for cash and tightens liquidity.The PBOC injected a net 490 billion yuan in the four days though Oct. 25 last year, and acted last week to funnel 200 billion yuan in one-year funds into the system.“Part of the timing is that we’re in the tax season, but a big part is that China wants to make sure there’s ample liquidity in the system,” said Gerry Alfonso, executive director of the international business department at Shenwan Hongyuan Group Co. “There are a lot of ups and downs, they want to calm the market, and they want to do it in a delicate way.”Government bonds tumbled and a gauge measuring traders’ bets on liquidity tightness jumped to the highest level since May on Monday. Investors turned cautious after local banks unexpectedly kept the base rate for corporate loans unchanged. A local report saying China may limit sales of bond funds also damped sentiment.China’s policy makers are preparing for two key meetings in the coming weeks with fresh evidence that economic growth will slow below 6%. PBOC Governor Yi Gang responded to last week’s gross domestic product data not by hinting at much greater stimulus in the pipeline, but by reminding investors that China’s focus remains on keeping its heavy debt load under control.“The PBOC wants a monetary policy that is not too tight or too loose,” said Larry Hu, head of China economics at Macquarie Securities Ltd. in Hong Kong. The slowing economy limits the room for the officials to tighten policy, while the rise in inflation means they can’t ease too much, he said.“But later this quarter, the PBOC will take a looser stance to aid the economy and the LPR will continue to fall,” Hu said. “The yield on government bonds will have room to drop.”\--With assistance from Claire Che and Helen Sun.To contact the reporters on this story: Elena Popina in Hong Kong at epopina@bloomberg.net;Tian Chen in Hong Kong at tchen259@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Richard Frost at rfrost4@bloomberg.net, Sofia Horta e Costa, Jeffrey BlackFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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Oil Steady as U.S. Crude Supplies Swell While Trade Hopes Build

Oil Steady as U.S. Crude Supplies Swell While Trade Hopes Build(Bloomberg) -- Oil was steady as investors weighed expectations for swelling American crude stockpiles against signs of U.S.-China trade progress.Futures in New York and Brent crude in London were little changed after falling the past two days. U.S. crude inventories probably rose for a sixth time through the week ended Oct. 18, the longest run of gains in almost a year, according to a Bloomberg survey before government data on Wednesday. President Donald Trump said China has indicated talks on a trade deal are advancing, offering a glimmer of hope for global demand.Oil has slid from an April peak as the dispute between Beijing and Washington dented demand and as U.S. crude inventories expanded above their five-year seasonal average. The impact of the trade war is responsible for about 70% of the price decline, while the rest is a result of abundant supply, according to Bloomberg Economics, predicting the trend will continue next year.“The oil market is listless and range-bound,” said John Driscoll, chief strategist at JTD Energy Services Pte in Singapore. It’s facing macroeconomic headwinds, weaker fundamentals and onerous tanker freight rates, he said.West Texas Intermediate for November delivery, which expires Tuesday, rose 4 cents to $53.35 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange as of 12:07 p.m. in Singapore. The more-active December contract fell 2 cents to $53.49.Brent for December settlement lost 2 cents to $58.94 on the London-based ICE Futures Europe Exchange after closing 0.8% lower on Monday. The global benchmark crude traded at a $5.45 premium to WTI for the same month.See also: Chinese Contractor Ends Oil-Project Deals With Venezuelan FirmsU.S. crude stockpiles are expected to increase by 3 million barrels, according to the median estimate of 11 analysts surveyed by Bloomberg. If confirmed by the Energy Information Administration, it would be the longest run of gains since November. Industry data is due later Tuesday.Trump said Monday he hopes to sign a trade deal at a summit in Chile next month, while U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin will speak with their Chinese counterparts on Friday. Policy makers in China are preparing for two key meetings in the coming weeks with fresh evidence that economic growth, already at its lowest in almost three decades, will continue to slip.\--With assistance from James Thornhill and Ziad Daoud (Economist).To contact the reporter on this story: Saket Sundria in Singapore at ssundria@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Serene Cheong at scheong20@bloomberg.net, Ben SharplesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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Trudeau Poised for Re-Election With Weakened Canada Mandate

Trudeau Poised for Re-Election With Weakened Canada Mandate(Bloomberg) -- Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, whose popularity has taken a hit from a series of scandals, won a second term in national elections with a reduced mandate that will force him to rely on other parties to govern.Trudeau’s Liberal Party won or was leading in 155 of Canada’s 338 electoral districts, short of the 170 needed for a majority in parliament, according to Election Canada results. The most likely partner for Trudeau would be the pro-labor New Democratic Party, which is on track to win 26 seats, giving the two parties a combined 181.The weakened mandate will nonetheless come as a relief for Trudeau, 47, who entered the campaign wounded by a scandal over his handling of a judicial case for a Quebec engineering firm, and was further rocked by revelations he wore blackface at least three times when he was young.The prospect of a relatively stable minority government sparked little market reaction, with the Canadian dollar trading little changed at C$1.3086, a three-month high. One Canadian dollar buys 76 U.S. cents.The scandals weren’t enough to derail Trudeau’s campaign, which sought to portray the prime minister as the only real progressive option and to frame the election as an opportunity to consolidate his gains on climate change. Still, the Liberal seat projections are well off the 184 the party won in 2015, when Trudeau swept to power with a majority government.The second term would allow the Liberal leader to cement one of the most left-leaning agendas the country has seen in at least a generation -- progressive on social issues, willing to run deficits to tackle income disparities, assertive on climate change and fervently internationalist in an era of populism. The push to the left would be accelerated if the Liberals are forced to team up with the NDP, which campaigned on increased social programs, such as pharmacare and dental care.The results exposed a stark regional divide. The Conservatives -- which has championed the oil sector -- were on pace to finish second with at least 119 districts, with the bulk of those in the four western provinces. The Bloc Quebecois are on pace to finish with 32 districts, more than triple their tally from 2015.The NDP are Trudeau’s most natural ally, though certain issues may prove to be flash points, such as his push to build the Trans Mountain pipeline, which would carry crude from Alberta to a port near Vancouver. Trudeau’s government bought the pipeline last year to save its expansion after the previous owner, Kinder Morgan Inc., walked away. The NDP is anti-pipeline, and wants more aggressive moves to combat climate change and higher taxes for companies and the wealthy.The outcome however likely ensures the survival, for now, of a national carbon price, introduced by Trudeau. The Conservative Party had campaigned against the tax scheme, which also includes payments made to households as an offset.It also may mean Trudeau will need to ramp up spending even more than promised. The Liberals pledged to increase the government deficit to C$27.4 billion ($21 billion) next year to fund new campaign promises, bringing it above 1% of gross domestic product for the first time since 2012. That’s even before any new measures needed to accommodate requests from the NDP that may be needed in order to win their support.NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh has said he will lay out six requests to support any government in a minority parliament: a universal pharmacare plan and national dental care, investments in affordable housing, waiving interest on student loans, a “bold” plan on climate change, a tax on wealth and a price cap on mobile phone bills.The Liberal Party is already pledging about C$10 billion in new annual spending by 2023 to finance a slew of new promises, including more generous child benefit payments and employment insurance, extra funding for post-secondary education, and an increase in the old age supplement for low-income pensioners.Trudeau’s victory amounted to a rejection of Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, who failed to extend his party’s strength in the energy-rich prairies into breakthroughs in Ontario and Quebec, Canada’s two most populous provinces. Scheer campaigned on a small-government, pocketbook-issue platform akin to his predecessor, Stephen Harper, who governed Canada from 2006 to 2015. But the Conservatives didn’t poll much better than they did ahead of their 2015 loss.Trudeau’s minority government is the fourth in Canada’s past six elections. Harper governed through two minorities before finally winning a majority. Trudeau’s father, former prime minister Pierre Trudeau, was cut down to a minority in his second mandate, before winning two more majorities over the course of his political career.(Updates with market reaction in fifth paragraph)To contact the reporter on this story: Josh Wingrove in Washington at jwingrove4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Theophilos Argitis at targitis@bloomberg.net, Chris Fournier, David ScanlanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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Do Institutions Own Sing Lee Software (Group) Limited (HKG:8076) Shares?

Do Institutions Own Sing Lee Software (Group) Limited (HKG:8076) Shares?If you want to know who really controls Sing Lee Software (Group) Limited (HKG:8076), then you'll have to look at the...


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South Korea's third-quarter GDP q/q growth seen slowing, no quick recovery seen

South Korea's third-quarter GDP q/q growth seen slowing, no quick recovery seenSouth Korea's economy continued to grow in the third quarter but at a slower pace than in the second, when government spending lifted the pace following a contraction in January-March, a Reuters poll found on Tuesday. The median forecast from 26 economists for gross domestic product in July-September was to expand by a seasonally adjusted 0.5% from the previous quarter, when it grew 1.0%. During the third quarter, a supplementary budget aimed at supporting growth kicked in.


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Australian mining magnate applies for big new coal mine

Australian mining magnate applies for big new coal mineAustralian mining magnate Clive Palmer has renewed a push to develop a new coal mine in Queensland state, close to a controversial mine under construction by India's Adani Enterprises. Palmer's Waratah Coal applied to Australia's Department of Natural Resources on Oct. 4 for a 35-year mining lease in the Galilee Basin, a new coal region that won the green light this year for development. The application signals a resumption in development planning for the mine, which was first proposed in 2011 but which has been on ice in recent years.


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